Wondering how counter-smuggling operations impact the safety of migrants and the local dynamics of mobility? Find out by watching the full webinar.

Description

Migrant smuggling—the facilitation for profit of the entry of a person into a country other than their own—is at the core of the discourse worldwide on irregular migration, migration controls, and border security. The term ‘smuggling’, along with specific claims about its nature, has long been invoked by countries concerned about the presence of irregular migrants.  It is routine to characterize smuggling as managed by complex and cruel criminal organizations that garner staggering profits from their illegal actions. Recently, however, empirical work from several migration corridors has called into question many of these generalizations about sophisticated smuggling operations, calling for a more nuanced and bottom-up understanding of the facilitation of irregular migration. 

Although this empirical work has provided important and useful insights into the complexities of smuggling, it has neglected the impact of counter-smuggling measures on irregular migration. Counter-smuggling programs have become ubiquitous and often take the form of externalizing border controls through agreements with countries of transit. To fully understand irregular migration, we must consider the effects of counter-smuggling measures on migration patterns, on the migrants themselves, and on the societies from which they come and to which they travel. Efforts to control the smuggling services that are relied upon by many migrants can bring their own harms. The case studies now available suggest that criminalizing certain forms of migration and associated facilitation services by labelling them as ‘smuggling’ perversely fosters rather than contains clandestine mobility and exacerbates migrant victimization. Furthermore, counter-smuggling initiatives seem to create new, informal but consequential policing interactions among citizens as the responsibility to “detect” migrants travelling irregularly is extended to include bus drivers, shopkeepers, hotel owners, and ordinary citizens. 

In this webinar, we draw from examples in Europe, North Africa and the Americas to shed light on the effects of counter-smuggling operations on the safety of migrants and on the local dynamics of mobility.  

Speakers

Convenors

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The Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs and Metropolis International invite the submission of proposals for workshops, individual papers and posters for the 25th International Metropolis Conference 2022, taking place in Berlin from 4 to 9 September.

Submitting proposals for workshops, individual papers and posters

We welcome submissions in all areas of migration, mobility and its governance around the world, integration & inclusion, as well as population diversity. Proposals that address the conference themes or any of the plenary topics are especially welcome. So are those that approach migration, integration & inclusion, and diversity from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective.

General requirements for proposals

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL ON THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE

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Wondering how architecture and planning influence the settlement, integration, and well-being of immigrants and refugees? Find out by watching the full Webinar reply below.

Description

Among the aspects of newcomer settlement and integration that we usually emphasize such as

language, education, skills, discrimination, respect for rights, we rarely include architecture

and urban planning. And yet, if we think about what makes immigrants, refugees, and asylum

seekers feel comfortable in a new society, allows them to feel that they belong there, the built

environment is significant. Whether the homes they live in, the shops they visit, the places of

worship in which they gather, the schools they and their children attend, the spaces in which

they can socialize, the design of the buildings and their location relative to one another, all of

these affect the quality of their lives. Informal neighbourhoods in developing countries often

arise without the hand of professional architects or planners, yet bear identifiable cultural

hallmarks. Urban plans of cities in the West tend to ignore the cultural differences among

their residents, and architectural designs, whether mandated by regulations or not, tend to

reflect the mainstream populations’ preferences. But when newcomer neighbourhoods

become larger and more highly concentrated as in modern middle class suburban ethnic

enclaves or in arrival spaces for large numbers of refugees and asylum seekers, the effects of

architecture and urban plans can become acute.

Speakers

Convenors

Hosted by

Metropolis International, established in 1996, is the largest cross-sectoral international

network of professionals in the field of migration, integration/inclusion, and diversity. It

provides an international platform for constructive dialogue and effective production &

dissemination of policy-relevant, socially-meaningful, and evidence-based knowledge across

the policy, research, civil society, and private sectors.

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It is with great sadness that the migration community has to unexpectedly say the farewell to Ambassador Swing, former Director General of IOM. Many of us had the pleasure to meet and listen to him at International Metropolis Conferences over the years and to work with him to improve migration governance. We considered him a friend.

Metropolis International joins the larger community in taking a moment to honour his drive, leadership and compassion in this field, and to relay the International Steering Committee's condolences and support to his family and his colleagues at IOM. 

IOM Mourns Death of Former Director-General William Lacy Swing

June 2021

Metropolis International

Prof. Jan Rath, Co-Chair 

Prof. em. Paul Spoonley, Co-Chair 

Mihaela Vieru, Senior Program Manager 
https://carleton.ca/metropolis/

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Time & date

The webinar took place on Wednesday May 26, 2021, 16:30-18:00 EEST (Beirut, UTC+3).

Description

It was ten years ago that Syrians fleeing the civil war in their country began seeking refuge in Lebanon as well as Turkey, Jordan, and elsewhere. Now with roughly 1.5 million Syrian refugees, Lebanon is host to the highest per capita population of refugees in the world at 20%. This is an astonishing figure for any country, but especially for a country as otherwise troubled as Lebanon. Many of those Syrians who fled the dangers of civil war have encountered in Lebanon poverty, food insecurity, discrimination, violence, and clear efforts to have them return to an as yet unsafe homeland. These conditions were exacerbated by the Beirut explosion and more recently by the Covid pandemic. Life for the Syrian refugees has been difficult, but their presence in an already fragile country has made things yet more difficult for the Lebanese nationals.

This webinar will look at the living conditions of Syrian refugees in informal settlements and in Lebanon’s towns and cities. The three speakers will offer the results of their in-depth research into how the Lebanese government, humanitarian organizations, and the international community have handled the crisis so far while offering prospects for effective policies beneficial to the situation of refugees and that of the vulnerable communities hosting them. The focus of the webinar will be on future approaches that would improve refugees’ living conditions accompanied by a retrospective on what has been done so far in dealing with their situation.

 Convenors

 Speakers

Hosted by

Metropolis International, established in 1996, is the largest cross-sectoral international network of professionals in the field of migration, integration/inclusion, and diversity. It provides an international platform for constructive dialogue and effective production & dissemination of policy-relevant, socially-meaningful, and evidence-based knowledge across the policy, research, civil society, and private sectors.

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Webinar 1 — African Migration: dreams and trajectories

Date: Wednesday April 28, 2021, 15:00-16:15 WET (UTC+0)

Description

The African continent has always been a site of population mobility, due to a host of structural determinants varying from economic inequality, environmental risks, social and political conflicts, education, adventure and so forth. In some ways, the root causes of migration in Africa are exactly the same as everywhere else. 

The second webinar revolves around European and African attempts to regulate these processes. The European Union (EU) and its members states have been uneasy with African migration to the North and aims to intervene in a variety of ways, with unprecedented force, and to a certain extent in collaboration with African partners so as to contain African mobility. How do these efforts, that some see as paternalistic and exclusionist, intervene in the journeys that many Africans are undertaking?

Convenors

Speakers

Webinar 2 — African Migration: the making of the ‘responsible migrant’

Cohosted by

The Moroccan Institute of Advanced Studies (IMEA), recently established by the Mohammed V University in Rabat, Morocco has the mission to promote high-level research in the humanities and social sciences and to promote dialogue and interactions with other scientific fields. http://imea.um5.ac.ma/en/home-2/ 

Metropolis International, established in 1996, is the largest cross-sectoral international network of professionals in the field of migration, integration/inclusion, and diversity. It provides an international platform for constructive dialogue and effective production & dissemination of policy-relevant, socially-meaningful, and evidence-based knowledge across the policy, research, civil society, and private sectors.

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Webinar 1 — African Migration: dreams and trajectories

Date: Wednesday April 28, 2021, 15:00-16:15 WET (UTC+0)

Description

The African continent has always been a site of population mobility, due to a host of structural determinants varying from economic inequality, environmental risks, social and political conflicts, education, adventure and so forth. In some ways, the root causes of migration in Africa are exactly the same as everywhere else. 

Taking these well-known structural causes as a starting point, the first webinar aims to explore what individuals and families do with it. Key words then are hope and aspiration, motivations, dreams. Those who decide to move to greener pastures embark on an unknown journey into an ever changing environment full of uncertainties, risks and new opportunities. How are they able to maneuver through life and across space by circumventing social, cultural and political hurdles, and by finding the narrow path from one small opportunity to the other?

Convenors

Speakers

Webinar 1 — African Migration: dreams and trajectories

Cohosted by

The Moroccan Institute of Advanced Studies (IMEA), recently established by the Mohammed V University in Rabat, Morocco has the mission to promote high-level research in the humanities and social sciences and to promote dialogue and interactions with other scientific fields. http://imea.um5.ac.ma/en/home-2/ 

Metropolis International, established in 1996, is the largest cross-sectoral international network of professionals in the field of migration, integration/inclusion, and diversity. It provides an international platform for constructive dialogue and effective production & dissemination of policy-relevant, socially-meaningful, and evidence-based knowledge across the policy, research, civil society, and private sectors.

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