Date: Wednesday June 15 2022

Time: 10:00-11:15 EST (Ottawa, ONT)

This is 07:00 PST (Vancouver), 15:00 GMT (London), 16:00 CET (Amsterdam), 17:00 TRT

(Istanbul, TR, and 22:00 SGT (Singapore).


Wondering how counter-smuggling operations impact the safety of migrants and

the local dynamics of mobility? Join us for the upcoming webinar organized by

Metropolis International.


Registration

Only registered persons can be allowed to the webinar. For those who have not yet

registered, click here.


Description

Migrant smuggling—the facilitation for profit of the entry of a person into a country

other than their own—is at the core of the discourse worldwide on irregular migration,

migration controls, and border security. The term ‘smuggling’, along with specific

claims about its nature, has long been invoked by countries concerned about the

presence of irregular migrants. It is routine to characterize smuggling as managed by

complex and cruel criminal organizations that garner staggering profits from their

illegal actions. Recently, however, empirical work from several migration corridors has

called into question many of these generalizations about sophisticated smuggling

operations, calling for a more nuanced and bottom-up understanding of the facilitation

of irregular migration.

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Although this empirical work has provided important and useful insights into the

complexities of smuggling, it has neglected the impact of counter-smuggling measures

on irregular migration. Counter-smuggling programs have become ubiquitous and

often take the form of externalizing border controls through agreements with countries

of transit. To fully understand irregular migration, we must consider the effects of

counter-smuggling measures on migration patterns, on the migrants themselves, and

on the societies from which they come and to which they travel. Efforts to control the

smuggling services that are relied upon by many migrants can bring their own harms.

The case studies now available suggest that criminalizing certain forms of migration

and associated facilitation services by labelling them as ‘smuggling’ perversely fosters

rather than contains clandestine mobility and exacerbates migrant victimization.

Furthermore, counter-smuggling initiatives seem to create new, informal but

consequential policing interactions among citizens as the responsibility to “detect”

migrants travelling irregularly is extended to include bus drivers, shopkeepers, hotel

owners, and ordinary citizens.

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In this webinar, we draw from examples in Europe, North Africa and the Americas to

shed light on the effects of counter-smuggling operations on the safety of migrants

and on the local dynamics of mobility.


Speakers


Convenors


Hosted by

Metropolis International, established in 1996, is the largest cross-sectoral international

network of professionals in the field of migration, integration/inclusion, and diversity. It

provides an international platform for constructive dialogue and effective production &

dissemination of policy-relevant, socially-meaningful, and evidence-based knowledge across

the policy, research, civil society, and private sectors.


Registration

Only registered persons can be allowed to the webinar. For those who have not yet

registered, click here.

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The Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs and Metropolis International invite the submission of proposals for workshops, individual papers and posters for the 25th International Metropolis Conference 2022, taking place in Berlin from 4 to 9 September.

Submitting proposals for workshops, individual papers and posters

We welcome submissions in all areas of migration, mobility and its governance around the world, integration & inclusion, as well as population diversity. Proposals that address the conference themes or any of the plenary topics are especially welcome. So are those that approach migration, integration & inclusion, and diversity from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective.

General requirements for proposals

SUBMIT A PROPOSAL ON THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE

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Metropolis Asia-Pacific invites you for another Webinar Series on November 25, 2021.

Join us, as our migration experts discuss the Report on the UN Climate Change Conference and the Impact of Climate Change on migration in South East Asia.


November 25, 2021 (Thursday):

6:00 AM | GERMANY
10:30 AM | INDIA | SRI LANKA
11:00 AM | BANGLADESH12:00 PM | THAILAND
1:00 PM | PHILIPPINES | CHINA | SINGAPORE | MALAYSIA
2:00 PM | KOREA
4:00 PM | AUSTRALIA
6:00 PM | NEW ZEALAND | FIJI

Speakers

OVAIS SARMAD: Deputy Executive SecretaryUnited Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC)Bonn, Germany
KRISTIN MARIE DADEY Chief of MissionInternational Organization for MigrationManila, Philippines
CARL MIDDLETON Director Center for Social Development StudiesChulalongkorn University, Thailand

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://bit.ly/3qStcx6

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Webinar will be streamed live in Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/MetropolisAsiaPacific

For additional information, check out our website: www.metropolisasiapacific.org

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Join us for the Webinar ‘How architecture and urban plans matter to immigrant and refugee integration’.

Wondering how architecture and planning influence the settlement, integration, and well-being of immigrants and refugees? Join us for the upcoming webinar organized by Metropolis International.

Date:

Wednesday June 30, 2021, 11:00-12:15 EDT (Ottawa, ONT)

This equals 08:00 EDT (Vancouver), 16:00 BST (London, UK), 17:00 CEST (Amsterdam), 18:00 TRT (Istanbul) or 23:00 SGT (Singapore).

Description

Among the aspects of newcomer settlement and integration that we usually emphasize such as language, education, skills, discrimination, respect for rights, we rarely include architecture and urban planning. And yet, if we think about what makes immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers feel comfortable in a new society, allows them to feel that they belong there, the built environment is significant. Whether the homes they live in, the shops they visit, the places of worship in which they gather, the schools they and their children attend, the spaces in which they can socialize, the design of the buildings and their location relative to one another, all of these affect the quality of their lives. Informal neighbourhoods in developing countries often arise without the hand of professional architects or planners, yet bear identifiable cultural hallmarks. Urban plans of cities in the West tend to ignore the cultural differences among their residents, and architectural designs, whether mandated by regulations or not, tend to reflect the mainstream populations’ preferences. But when newcomer neighbourhoods become larger and more highly concentrated as in modern middle class suburban ethnic enclaves or in arrival spaces for large numbers of refugees and asylum seekers, the effects of architecture and urban plans can become acute. This Metropolis webinar will explore the effects of architecture and planning on the settlement, integration, and well-being of immigrants and refugees and offer a corrective to the general neglect of these effects in our discussions of how best to manage the arrival of newcomers in our societies. Our speakers will offer a rare combination of expertise on both migration and architecture/urban planning.

Speakers

Convenors

Hosted by

Metropolis International, established in 1996, is the largest cross-sectoral international network of professionals in the field of migration, integration/inclusion, and diversity. It provides an international platform for constructive dialogue and effective production & dissemination of policy-relevant, socially-meaningful, and evidence-based knowledge across the policy, research, civil society, and private sectors. https://carleton.ca/metropolis/

Registration

Only registered persons can be allowed to the webinar. For those who have not yet registered, click here to register.

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Time & date

The webinar took place on Wednesday May 26, 2021, 16:30-18:00 EEST (Beirut, UTC+3).

Description

It was ten years ago that Syrians fleeing the civil war in their country began seeking refuge in Lebanon as well as Turkey, Jordan, and elsewhere. Now with roughly 1.5 million Syrian refugees, Lebanon is host to the highest per capita population of refugees in the world at 20%. This is an astonishing figure for any country, but especially for a country as otherwise troubled as Lebanon. Many of those Syrians who fled the dangers of civil war have encountered in Lebanon poverty, food insecurity, discrimination, violence, and clear efforts to have them return to an as yet unsafe homeland. These conditions were exacerbated by the Beirut explosion and more recently by the Covid pandemic. Life for the Syrian refugees has been difficult, but their presence in an already fragile country has made things yet more difficult for the Lebanese nationals.

This webinar will look at the living conditions of Syrian refugees in informal settlements and in Lebanon’s towns and cities. The three speakers will offer the results of their in-depth research into how the Lebanese government, humanitarian organizations, and the international community have handled the crisis so far while offering prospects for effective policies beneficial to the situation of refugees and that of the vulnerable communities hosting them. The focus of the webinar will be on future approaches that would improve refugees’ living conditions accompanied by a retrospective on what has been done so far in dealing with their situation.

 Convenors

 Speakers

Hosted by

Metropolis International, established in 1996, is the largest cross-sectoral international network of professionals in the field of migration, integration/inclusion, and diversity. It provides an international platform for constructive dialogue and effective production & dissemination of policy-relevant, socially-meaningful, and evidence-based knowledge across the policy, research, civil society, and private sectors.

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Metropolis International Conference Berlin Logo

Berlin becomes the centre of international exchange on migration, integration and diversity!

Under the title Changing Migration, Migration in Change, the International Metropolis Conference in Berlin in 2022 offers a cross-sectoral platform for experts from around the world to discuss the latest in migration, integration and diversity. Join researchers, policymakers, practitioners, business leaders, and civil society and international organizations representatives for a week of analysis, policy insights, and practice exchange. Key themes include:

The impact of COVID-19 on migration and mobility

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed major challenges to societies worldwide and is likely to have an impact on all aspects of human mobility and associated socio-economic outcomes for a long time. There is a need to rethink migration health and strategize ways in which international migration and mobility can play a role in the post-pandemic recovery of societies, many of which have experienced notable changes in the structure, nature and direction of migration flows. Such considerations range from mitigating the negative consequences for migrant workers and international students, as well as refugees and internally displaced persons, to tackling issues of inequality and inclusion that have been exposed by the pandemic. What does this mean for the governance of migration and mobility going forward? What shifts can be expected?

Technological development and the future of work

Rapid technological developments and digital transformations are reshaping the nature of work and employment, including the needs in economies and the skills in demand. What will the future of work look like and what are the effects on patterns of labour mobility and migration? How will current approaches to workforce recruitment, labour market integration or national citizenship be adjusted and with what social and cultural ramifications?

Climate change and migration

Global warming is already placing significant stress on how societies operate and think about the future. Local, regional, and global migration dynamics are expected to also bear the impact of climate change, in close connection with stressors such as conflict or demographic change, among many others. We want to encourage discussion of specific intersections between these processes with a focus on migration decisions, paths followed, humanitarian needs and policy options.

Conditions for fair migration

A current challenge for governments, international agencies and a range of communities is how to respond to societal and economic needs, mobility imperatives and migration pressures while also ensuring fair and sustainable systems and processes that take the interests of all stakeholders into account: migrants, countries of origin, transit, and destination. What does “fair migration” look like from a range of perspectives and on different scales? Who counts as a stakeholder, how are interests negotiated and cooperation reached and with what outcomes? What best practices are out there and how can different futures be envisioned?

The Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs in Germany and Metropolis International are planning this conference as an on-site event (with some limited virtual participation) at the bcc Berlin Congress Center, 4-9 September, 2022.

Save the date, we are looking forward to welcoming you in Berlin!

More details about the conference will be posted on the conference website @ www.imcb22.de, starting 1 July, 2021.

For inquiries about the conference and to sign up for updates, please email imcb22@bmas.bund.de

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